How not to cancel a show

Or, Saturday afternoon at The Other Palace.

Stuff happens. I saw The Wild Party last month, loved it, booked to go back for a repeat visit at the last matinée of the run – but when I arrived at the theatre yesterday, about half-an-hour before the performance was due to begin, I was handed this at the door:

other palace cancellation

Disappointing, obviously, but this is live theatre: it’s made by people, not machines, and people sometimes get sick, and in an off-West End venue budgets don’t stretch to hiring understudies. You book a ticket taking a calculated risk that the performance will go ahead; yesterday, someone in the cast was ill, so it couldn’t.

The evening performance did go ahead, and I can understand cancelling a matinee to enable a performer to get through the show’s closing performance – particularly having seen this show, whose very, very physical staging must have demanded an enormous amount of energy from every member of the cast.

From a customer service perspective, though, the experience left a great deal to be desired. First, let’s look at that letter: at the bottom, admittedly partly cut off by my inept photography, it informs me that a cheque for the full amount (of the refund for my ticket) will be forwarded to me within 14 days. They’ve backpeddalled from that since, and will be processing card refunds (and doing so far more quickly), and with good reason: if I pay you for a service, and you are unable for whatever reason to provide that service, telling me you’ll sit on my money and refund it at your leisure isn’t acceptable. It’s also – bizarrely – more work than simply processing credit/debit card refunds, so why suggest it in the first place?

More problematic is the timing of the cancellation. It can’t have come as a total surprise, given that Thursday night’s performance was apparently also cancelled. I understand not wanting to let a paying audience down, but there’s more than one way of letting people down: I don’t exactly live around the corner from the theatre, I’d travelled about 200 miles to see the show and the train fare was significantly more expensive than the theatre ticket, and (notwithstanding the fact that I was there last week too), I am generally in London infrequently enough that there are a lot of things I don’t get the opportunity to see. At 2pm, when I learned the performance had been cancelled, the only other option close by for an afternoon at the theatre was Wicked, and I’m not a masochist. The Other Palace is just far enough from the heart of the West End that getting to another theatre, buying a ticket, and getting seated for another 2.30pm performance wasn’t going to happen. Theatres in London draw from a very, very wide catchment area; unfortunately performances do sometimes have to be cancelled, but customers who have travelled – and I mean even from zone 2, never mind from up north – deserve the opportunity to try to arrange to see something else instead. Because the cancellation was announced so late yesterday, I didn’t get that opportunity – the other things I would have liked to see all started at the same time – and without the theatre ticket, I wouldn’t have spent the money on the train fare.

The theatre did – eventually – tweet and email about the cancellation, but note the time stamps:

other palace tweet

other palace time stamp

 

This is information that should have reached customers as soon as possible before the performance was scheduled to begin; again, tweeting ten minutes after showtime and not emailing until forty minutes after that suggests customer service is hardly the venue’s first priority. I do understand, as I said, that people get sick. I understand delaying the decision to cancel as long as possible, in the hope that you won’t have to disappoint customers – but what happened yesterday afternoon ended up being the worst of all possible worlds. Tweets are easy to miss, but that email announcing the cancellation should have reached my inbox (and therefore my phone) an hour before curtain time, not fifty minutes afterwards; theatres have a responsibility to their customers as well as to the performers, and yesterday afternoon The Other Palace let their customers down.

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